Foods such as asparagus, oatmeal, black beans and avocados help prebiotics do their job. These foods are rich in soluble fiber, a nutrient dubbed the “next big thing” on ABC-TV’s Eyewitness News, Los Angeles. Nutritional biochemist Shawn Talbott, explained: “They can grow good bacteria and also starve out bad bacteria, as bad bacteria will sometimes grow on sugar.” Many people don’t get enough soluble fiber in their diet, but supplements are available, including Sunfiber which was featured during the segment.

One serving of Sunfiber contains five grams of prebiotic soluble fiber. This fiber nourishes the gut’s beneficial bacteria, supporting intestinal balance and overall wellness. Soluble fiber also helps food move through the digestive system at just the right pace, improving both occasional constipation and occasional diarrhea. Plus, soluble fiber consumption may help support heart health.  

Talbott explained that beneficial bacteria in our gut may do even more than support our digestive health. “What we’re learning is that probiotics can have benefits all throughout the body. They can be good for the skin or the brain or the heart or your muscles or your waistline.” That’s why it’s important to support the health of our gut flora with quality soluble fiber.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Monash University Low FODMAP Certified™. A low FODMAP diet does not treat a disease, but may help to meet nutrition needs with reduced gastrointestinal symptoms. Monash University receives a license fee for use of the Monash University Low FODMAP Certified trademarks.

Tomorrow's Nutrition © 2020 All Rights Reserved.

*These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Monash University Low FODMAP Certified™. A low FODMAP diet does not treat a disease, but may help to meet nutrition needs with reduced gastrointestinal symptoms. Monash University receives a license fee for use of the Monash University Low FODMAP Certified trademarks.

Tomorrow's Nutrition © 2020 All Rights Reserved.